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The Crown: documents under the Great Seal of England

"The Crown" has since the Middle Ages represented the monarch or somethign akin to 'state'. The concept of the Crown took forum under the feudal system where all rights and privileges were ultimately bestowed by the ruler - in England's case the monarch. All official documents from about the 11th -19th centuries carried a wax impression of an appropriate seal to authenticate them.  the Great Seal of England typically portrayed the king on horseback, with drawn sword and a shield bearing the royal arms on one side and on the reverse the monarch would be enthroned with the crown and sceptre of state.

Richard I: charter witnessed whilst on crusade in Acre
Confirmation to John de Ospringe, Richard I while on crusade at Acre and witnessed at Joppa, 1192.
 
Grant, to St Sulpice Abbey and Lilliechurch Priory, King John, 1201
Grant, to St Sulpice Abbey and Lilliechurch Priory, King John 1201
Letters patent: Edward II, 1325
Letters patent of Edward II to Ospringe Hospital, 1325
Letters patent of Edward IV, 1463
Letters Patent of Edward IV confirming grants of earlier monarchs to Ospringe Hospital, 1463
Pardon, Richard III to St John's Hospital, 1484
Pardon, Richard III to St John's Hospital, 1484
Confirmation: Henry VIII, 1515
Confirmation of the Hospital of Opringe's traditional liberties, Henry VIII, 1515
Great Seal of Elizabeth I
Mortmain licence with Great Seal of Elizabeth I, 1568