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Meet the new St John’s Research Fellows 2019

Research Fellowships

Research Fellowships

St John's College has elected five exceptional new Research Fellows to join our vibrant academic community.

The Research Fellowships provide the opportunity for outstanding researchers early in their careers to carry out independent study in a stimulating and supportive environment.

The areas of study of the new academics range from analysing the work of Latin satirists Horace and Persius to developing new physical approaches for exploring the behavior of complex protein systems.

They will all join the College in October 2019.

 

Talitha Kearey

Ms Kearey studied Classics at both undergraduate and graduate level at Clare College, Cambridge.  After completing her doctorate in 2018, she spent a year as Stipendiary Lecturer in Classical Languages and Literature at Magdalen College, Oxford. Her research focuses on Latin poetry of the first centuries BCE and CE and its reception, with a particular interest in authorial self-fashioning; she also maintains research interests in Latin poetic and prose texts, the history of scholarship, reception studies, and literary and cultural theory (especially feminist and queer studies).

As a Research Fellow at St John’s, the focus of her research will expand to encompass the biographical and interpretative reception of other Latin poets beyond Virgil (the focus of her doctoral work), particularly the satirists Horace, Persius and Juvenal.

Talitha Kearey

Matthew Lampitt

Mr Lampitt graduated from the University of Cambridge in 2013 with a degree in Modern and Medieval Languages, before moving to King’s College London (KCL) to complete an MA in French Literature and Culture.  He then taught as a British Council English-Language Assistant in Nîmes, before beginning his PhD at KCL in 2015.

His research focuses on medieval literature, particularly literature in (various kinds of) French. Drawing on network and actor-network theory, his PhD thesis formulated a new, interdisciplinary account of the multilingual literary culture(s) of the medieval Welsh Marches, encompassing texts in insular French, Welsh, English, and Latin.

As a Research Fellow at St John’s he will be working on a new project looking at medieval French literature in its global contexts.  His other research interests include: the troubadours, trobairitz, and literary culture of medieval Occitania; canon formation and models of literary history; medieval literature and critical theory.

 

Matthew Lampitt

Anna Plumridge

Ms Plumridge completed her BA (Hons) and MA at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. In 2016, she took up a Gates Cambridge Scholarship to pursue a PhD at St John’s College. Her research interests are in textual scholarship, with a particular focus on 19th and 20th century manuscripts, and colonial and postcolonial studies. She has produced scholarly editions of works by Katherine Mansfield and Samuel Butler.

As a Research Fellow at St John’s, she intends to write a monograph which explores the workings of the British Empire as a ‘textual exercise’, maintained through the media of ink and paper. She will focus, as a case study, on the public and personal papers of the colonial statesman, journalist and poet Alfred Domett (1811-1887).

Anna Plumridge

Kadi Liis Saar

Ms Saar studied Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology via Natural Sciences at Trinity College, Cambridge, before progressing to an MEng (Hons) in Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology in 2014. The same year she began her PhD in biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, during which she was also appointed as a visiting researcher at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University.

Her work focuses on developing new physical approaches for probing the behaviour of complex systems of proteins and the proteomic landscapes of single cells.

 

Kadi Liis Saar

Dr Rebecca Shercliff

Dr Shercliff received a BA, MPhil and PhD in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic from St John’s College, Cambridge.  Her research interests centre on medieval texts and their development in the context of their social, historical and literary background, with a particular focus on producing new editions and translations of previously neglected works. Her PhD thesis concerned a medieval Irish text and was entitled A Critical Edition of Tochmarc Ferbe, with Translation, Textual Notes and Literary Commentary, while her MPhil thesis considered the role of King Arthur in medieval Welsh literature.

During the tenure of her Fellowship, she will be exploring the ways in which medieval texts which are attested in multiple versions can illuminate how medieval authors went about composing or reworking their texts and what motivations prompted these activities.

 

Rebecca Shercliff