Visiting Fellows

Visiting Fellows have always enriched academic life here at St John's. We welcome visitors at different stages in their careers from all over the world.

Our current and recent Visiting Fellows are listed below.

Summer 2021

Professor Jeremy Schmit, Kansas State University, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Jeremy Schmit

Professor Schmit uses theoretical physics to understand the behaviour of systems containing large numbers of biomolecules. These systems exhibit complex phenomena, such as aggregation, phase transitions, self-assembly, and viscosity, that cannot be inferred from the properties of individual molecules. These emergent properties play an important role in cellular organisation, neurodegenerative diseases, and the formulation of therapeutic molecules.

Professor Schmit is sponsored by Professor Knowles.

Easter Term 2021

Dr Vivienne Westbrook, KIMEP University Kazakhstan, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Vivienne Westbrook

Dr Vivienne Westbrook is a Cultural Historian, a Professor of English and Cultural Studies and the Research Director for the College of Humanities and Education at KIMEP University in Kazakhstan. She is an Honorary Adjunct Professor in the School of Human Sciences and the School of English and Cultural Studies as well as a Senior Research Fellow at the Oceans Institute, the University of Western Australia.

Viv is currently the General Editor of four series that span the areas of Humour Studies, Animal Studies, Memoir and Maritime History and Culture. She is also the Editor of a new journal at KIMEP University: Language, Culture, Environment. During her Lady Margaret Beaufort Fellowship, she will, primarily, be working on a volume in the Oceans, Seas and Shorelines: a natural and cultural environmental history series with Dr. Mark Nicholls.

Dr Westbrook is sponsored by Dr Nicholls.

Find out more about her research projects at https://viviennewestbrook.com

Lent Term 2021

Dr Vivienne Westbrook, KIMEP University Kazakhstan, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Vivienne Westbrook

Dr Vivienne Westbrook is a Cultural Historian, a Professor of English and Cultural Studies and the Research Director for the College of Humanities and Education at KIMEP University in Kazakhstan. She is an Honorary Adjunct Professor in the School of Human Sciences and the School of English and Cultural Studies as well as a Senior Research Fellow at the Oceans Institute, the University of Western Australia.

Viv is currently the General Editor of four series that span the areas of Humour Studies, Animal Studies, Memoir and Maritime History and Culture. She is also the Editor of a new journal at KIMEP University: Language, Culture, Environment. During her Lady Margaret Beaufort Fellowship, she will, primarily, be working on a volume in the Oceans, Seas and Shorelines: a natural and cultural environmental history series with Dr. Mark Nicholls.

Dr Westbrook is sponsored by Dr Nicholls.

Find out more about her research projects at https://viviennewestbrook.com
 

 

Michaelmas Term 2020

Dr Vivienne Westbrook, KIMEP University Kazakhstan, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Vivienne Westbrook

Dr Vivienne Westbrook is a Cultural Historian, a Professor of English and Cultural Studies and the Research Director for the College of Humanities and Education at KIMEP University in Kazakhstan. She is an Honorary Adjunct Professor in the School of Human Sciences and the School of English and Cultural Studies as well as a Senior Research Fellow at the Oceans Institute, the University of Western Australia.

Viv is currently the General Editor of four series that span the areas of Humour Studies, Animal Studies, Memoir and Maritime History and Culture. She is also the Editor of a new journal at KIMEP University: Language, Culture, Environment. During her Lady Margaret Beaufort Fellowship, she will, primarily, be working on a volume in the Oceans, Seas and Shorelines: a natural and cultural environmental history series with Dr. Mark Nicholls.

Dr Westbrook is sponsored by Dr Nicholls.

Find out more about her research projects at https://viviennewestbrook.com

Lent Term 2020

Professor Francis Stewart, Dresden University of Technology, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Francis Stewart

Francis Stewart is Professor of Genomics at the Dresden University of Technology, which is one of the 11 elite German universities. He studied at the University of New South Wales, Sydney before post-doctoral work at the German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg. In 1991 he started his own group at EMBL (European Molecular Biology Laboratories) working on epigenetic regulation in mammalian development. Notably his lab described the PhD finger and the first histone 3 lysine 4 methyltransferase complex. His lab also pioneered several genetic engineering methodologies including the gene switch based ligand regulated site specific recombination (now popular as CreERT2/tamoxifen) and the recombinant DNA engineering methodology termed ‘recombineering’. In 2001 he moved to Dresden as the first appointment to the Biotechnology Center, now the Center for Molecular and Cellular Bioengineering at Dresden University. His lab continues to develop genetic engineering technologies and plumb epigenetic mysteries, in particular the relationship between histone methylation and gene expression in mammalian development. His sabbatical with Ernest Laue will employ recent technology developed by the Laue lab to investigate the involvement of histone methyltransferases in the nuclear architecture of differentiating embryonic stem cells.

Professor Stewart is sponsored by Professor Howard.
 

Professor Tone Bringa, University of Bergen, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Bringa T

Tone Bringa is Professor in Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen, Norway. Since she completed her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology on practiced Islam and ethnic belonging in Bosnia at the London School of Economics, she has explored the causes and effects of the war in Bosnia. More generally, she has been concerned with topics such as collapse of multi-ethnic states, post-socialist transformations, changing religious landscapes, and the politics of belonging highlighting how nationalist ideologies, fear and hate rhetoric directed at the “ethnic other” lead to genocide.

More recently, she has explored the spatial and temporal aspects of borders and the interaction between symbolic boundaries and territorial borders over time in order to gain a better understanding of the ethnic territorialisation of space, both through everyday spatial practices and through political means.

While a Beaufort Visiting Fellow at St. John’s she will be writing up fieldwork data, gathered in several villages and urban suburbs in Turkey settled by émigrés from Bosnia and Serbia who came to the country over the course of the 20th century. Based mainly on oral histories, this research resonates theoretically and thematically with several concerns that run through her academic work, not least a long term analytical and ethnographic approach which allows us to see how large scale historical events and developments shape and direct individuals’ life trajectories and their communities.

Her latest book is Eurasian Borderlands: Spatializing Borders in the Aftermath of State Collapse, co-edited with Hege Toje (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016).

Professor Bringa is sponsored by Professor Szreter.
 

Professor Antonello Alici, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

 Antonello Alici

Antonello Alici, architect, is Chair of History of Architecture at Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, and Member of the Doctorade School in Engineering Sciences, where he teaches a course on “Cultural Heritage”. In 2018 he was appointed Associate Professor in History of Architecture in the National Academic Competition.

He studied Architecture at the University of Florence and made his Doctoral studies on Renaissance Religious architecture in Central Italy at the University of Chieti-Pescara. His main research interests, besides studying Italian Renaissance and Baroque architecture, are in Contemporary Architecture. Thanks to several scholarships in Finland, he has lectured and published essays on avant-garde Finnish National Romanticism at the turn of last century, on the travels to Italy of Finnish architects, and more recently on Aino and Alvar Aalto. He was Visiting Scholar at the Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies at University of Cambridge in 2016/2017, and Visiting Professor at the International Doctoral Programme in Architectural Heritage Management and Tourism at Silpakorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He has given courses and seminars at the Aalto University in Helsinki and the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.

He is the Program Director of a summer school called ‘The Culture of City. Understanding the Urban Landscape”, that started a new series in the Marche region in 2018, with the topic “Living with Earthquakes. A strategic plan for earthquake prone regions”.

His interest on the relationships between Italian and British architects was the main reason he applied for a research year at the Martin Centre for Architecture and Urban Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2016/2017, an experience that proved to be central in focusing on the urban and architectural history of contemporary Cambridge. The postwar debate on the future of the city and on its identity as a ‘university city’ is particularly relevant to a revived interest internationally in post-war British architecture. This chapter becomes even more relevant when the archives of sir Leslie Martin and Colin St John Wilson have been made available at the RIBA Collection. The Centennial of the Italian architect Giancarlo De Carlo in 2019-2020 inspries him to explore his close connection with British culture, from William Morris and Patrick Geddes to the school of Cambridge and Team 10.

His main aim in coming to Cambridge as a Beaufort Visiting Fellow is to improve his knowledge and continue his research on the postwar urban and architectural history of Cambridge.

The contribution of the University and individual colleges deserves a more thorough study, and this can begin with the documents that are available in the architects’ and colleges’ archives. Following his recent publication on Peterhouse (A. Alici, Peterhouse. Prove di modernità in un college di Cambridge, «Città e Storia», XII, 2017, 2, pp. 287-313), he aims to research in detail the policy of St John’s College in the commission of new buildings and facilities for students and fellows, from the Maufe Building, completed in 1939, to the New Library, designed by Edward Cullinan architects and opened on January 1994.

The central focus of his research will be on the Cripps Building, built in 1963-67, and judged from its completion as a masterpiece, both for its design and its contribution to the urban landscape. It bears all the hallmarks of one of the most important and successful partnerships of the time, Powell & Moya. This furnishes a relevant case study for research, making use of the partnership’s archives, and working from the College’s own archives, to follow the discussions and decisions that led to the building as we see it now.

Professor Antonello Alici is sponsored by Professor Deborah Howard.

 

Professor Jing Lei, Carnegie Mellon University, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Lei J

Jing Lei is an Associate Professor in the Department of Statistics and Data Science at Carnegie Mellon University.  He obtained PhD in statistics from University of California, Berkeley in 2010, advised by Professor Peter Bickel.  His research interests includes nonparametric inference, probability theory, high dimensional inference, and network data.  He received a US National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2016, and received American Statistical Association Noether Young Scholar Award in 2016.  During his visit at Cambridge, Prof Lei will work on distribution free nonparametric inference with application to hypothesis testing, and efficient estimation of multi-model network data with a tensor structure, using novel probability tools for matrix data.  Prof Lei also plans to develop a new course on modern probability theory with applications in statistics.

 

Professor Bruce Hay, California Institute of Technology, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Bruce Hay

As a Beaufort Visiting Fellow, Professor Hay will synthesise his research while writing manuscripts on gene drive and mitochondrial quality control; interact with the extraordinarily active Drosophila and mitochondrial biology communities around Cambridge, and work with faculty and entrepreneurs in and around Cambridge on ways to slow or reverse diseases of ageing associated with defects in mitochondrial function.

Professor Hay is sponsored by Professor Knowles.

 

Dr Nicola McDonald, University of York, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Nicola McDonald

Dr Nicola McDonald (BA, MA University of Toronto, MPhil, DPhil, University of Oxford) is Senior Lecture in the Department of English and Related Literature and the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of York. Her current research concentrates on Middle English romance, the most important form of secular literature to emerge from medieval England, and its fundamentally interrogative character. Romance, she posits, is not only a new learned language, a modern self-consciously literate genre, sure in its capacity to rival its namesake, Rome, but late medieval English lay culture’s preeminent mode of inquiry.  Relevant publications include the landmark Pulp Fictions of Medieval England (2004), the recent Thinking Medieval Romance (2018) and the online Database of Middle English Romance (2012). While at St John’s, her research will focus principally on the audiences of Middle English romance, including the surviving manuscripts (many of which are housed in Cambridge collections) and the evidence they provide not just for ownership but for the radically different hermeneutics that their typically diverse contents model. 

Dr McDonald is sponsored by Dr Da Rold.

 

Professor Susanna Berger, University of Southern California, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Susanna Berger

Professor Susanna Berger is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Southern California. She was previously a member of the Society of Fellows at Princeton University. Her research and teaching explore diverse facets of art and visual culture in early modern Europe (ca. 1500–1800), from prints and drawings of philosophical knowledge to central works in the history of European painting by Caravaggio and other artists. Her first book, The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment, appeared with Princeton University Press in 2017. This project is a transnational study of the relations between images and philosophical knowledge in early modern Italy, England, Germany, the Netherlands, and France. The central thesis of the book is that in this period the production and contemplation of visual art were conceived as activities essential to philosophical thought, not supplementary exercises. The Art of Philosophy was awarded the 2018 Bainton Art and Music Prize for the best book in English in the field of early modern art and music from the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. A Chinese translation is forthcoming in 2021. She is currently working on a book about the ways in which Italian and French artists, elite collectors, and scholars first theorized the notion of visual expertise. In addition, she is collaborating with Daniel Garber on an edited volume, entitled Teaching Philosophy in the Early Modern Period: Text and Image. This book explores the pedagogical contexts in which philosophical knowledge was made in the early modern era and disputes over science were played out.

Professor Berger is sponsored by Dr Abbott.

 

Dr Brighton Mupangavanhu, University of the Western Cape, Colenso Visiting Fellow

Mupangavanhu B

Dr Brighton M Mupangavanhu is a member of the Mercantile & Labour Law Department at South Africa’s University of the Western Cape (UWC), who joined the Law Faculty in 2014. He teaches commercial law subjects at LL.B, namely Corporate Law & Law of Payment Instruments (to become Commercial Transactions Law after 2020) and Company Law for B. Comm students. He holds a PhD: Commercial Law Degree from the University of Cape Town (UCT); an LL.M from University of Natal (now UKZN); an LL.B from Fort Hare University (UFH). In addition, Dr Mupangavanhu’s professional development/training is evidenced by a Legal Education and Development (LEAD) certificate from the Cape Town-based School for Legal Practice and a PG Certificate in Legal Practice (UCT). He also obtained a teaching and learning certificate for a course entitled Towards Professionalisation of Teaching & Learning in Higher Education (UWC). In 2019, Dr Mupangavanhu graduated with a certificate in the Program for Academic and Professional Leaders course at UWC (2018-2019), aimed at enhancing leadership capabilities. Dr Mupangavanhu specialises and conducts research in the following areas of interest: Corporate Governance & Finance Law; Banking and Financial Services Law; the interface between corporate law and other areas of law such as contract law, legal interpretation, constitutional law & intellectual property law. Dr Mupangavanhu supervises and teaches postgraduate students at LL.M (Masters) and LL.D (Doctoral) levels primarily in the areas of corporate law and banking/financial services law. Scholarships held during his academic studies include: the Presidential Scholarship to study towards an LL.B degree; the Wilfred Kramer Grant and Law Faculty Special Scholarship – for doctoral studies at UCT. Dr Mupangavanhu’s research work has attracted the interest of legal practitioners, academics and company boards as evidenced by several invitations to be a keynote speaker at conferences, invitations to address company boards on various corporate governance and corporate finance law matters and to offer on-boarding induction workshops by company boards in Cape Town and Johannesburg in particular, and also invitations to examine LL.M and PhD theses from South African and other African public universities as well as some private universities. Dr Mupangavanhu’s individual accolades received to date include graduating with a number of distinctions at LL.B; being named best Constitutional Law student at LL.B level and top student in Constitutional Practice module during the LEAD course at the School for Legal Practice. He has held middle management positions within higher education prior to joining the Law Faculty as an academic in 2014. Dr Mupangavanhu has presented several conference papers at various local & international conferences held in South Africa and at a regional conference in Namibia. In 2020, Dr Mupangavanhu will be a visiting Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge in the UK, after he received the Colenso Visiting Scholarship at St John’s College.

Dr Mupangavanhu is sponsored by Dr Gardner.

Michaelmas Term 2019

Professor Francis Stewart, Dresden University of Technology, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Francis Stewart

Francis Stewart is Professor of Genomics at the Dresden University of Technology, which is one of the 11 elite German universities. He studied at the University of New South Wales, Sydney before post-doctoral work at the German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg. In 1991 he started his own group at EMBL (European Molecular Biology Laboratories) working on epigenetic regulation in mammalian development. Notably his lab described the PhD finger and the first histone 3 lysine 4 methyltransferase complex. His lab also pioneered several genetic engineering methodologies including the gene switch based ligand regulated site specific recombination (now popular as CreERT2/tamoxifen) and the recombinant DNA engineering methodology termed ‘recombineering’. In 2001 he moved to Dresden as the first appointment to the Biotechnology Center, now the Center for Molecular and Cellular Bioengineering at Dresden University. His lab continues to develop genetic engineering technologies and plumb epigenetic mysteries, in particular the relationship between histone methylation and gene expression in mammalian development. His sabbatical with Ernest Laue will employ recent technology developed by the Laue lab to investigate the involvement of histone methyltransferases in the nuclear architecture of differentiating embryonic stem cells.

Professor Stewart is sponsored by Professor Howard.
 

Professor Thuc-Quyen Nguyen, University of California, Santa Barbara, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Nguyen TQ

Thuc-Quyen Nguyen is the Director of the Center for Polymers and Organic Solids (CPOS) and Professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). Professor Nguyen received her PhD degrees in Physical Chemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. She was a research associate in the Department of Chemistry and the Nanocenter at Columbia University from 2001-2004. She joined the faculty of the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department at UCSB in July 2004. Recognition for her research includes the 2005 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the 2006 National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the 2007 Harold Plous Award, the 2008 Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award, the 2009 Alfred Sloan Research Fellows, the 2010 National Science Foundation American Competitiveness and Innovation Fellows, the 2015 Alexander von Humboldt Senior Research Award, the 2016 Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the 2015-2018 World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds; Top 1% Highly Cited Researchers in Materials Science by Thomson Reuters and Clarivate Analytics. Her current research interests are doping in organic semiconductors, charge transport in organic semiconductors, bioelectronics, and device physics of organic solar cells, ratchets, transistors, and photodetectors. Her sabbatical with George Malliaras will focus on interfacing electronic devices with human body for applications in healthcare. She will also work with Sir Richard Friend on understanding charge generation in organic solar cells.     

Professor Nguyen  is sponsored by Professor Sir Richard Friend.
 

Professor Theo Broodryk, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa, Colenso Visiting Fellow

BroodrykT

Professor Theo Broodryk is an Associate Professor and the Managing Attorney of the Stellenbosch University Law Clinic. He completed his postgraduate LLB-degree in 2008. He commenced his articles of clerkship at Edward Nathan Sonnenbergs Inc in 2009 where he also practised as an attorney until September 2012. Prof Broodryk commenced employment with the Stellenbosch University Law Faculty in October 2012. He is responsible for lecturing Civil Procedure and Legal Skills. He holds the BA, LLB and LLD degrees. He authors Eckard’s Principles of Civil Procedure in the Magistrates’ Courts, has published numerous law journal articles and has been awarded research funding awards and scholarships to conduct research at leading law schools internationally. Prof Broodryk’s research at Cambridge University will consider the regulation of small amount credit and how the private law interacts with social policy and social welfare. It will specifically be aimed at considering the regulation of modest credit amounts and the different dispute resolution methods available under South African and English consumer protection legislation, including class actions. The research will aim to make a contribution to the future development of legal theory in this regard.

Professor Theo Broodryk is sponsored by Dr Albors-Llorens.
 

Professor Walter Woon,National University of Singapore, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Woon W

Professor Woon is presently Senior Counsel and David Marshall Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore; concurrently Dean, Singapore Institute of Legal Education; Chairman and Senior Consultant, RHTLaw Taylor Wessing LLP. Formerly Attorney-General, Ambassador and member of the board of directors of the Monetary Authority of Singapore, Intraco Ltd and Natsteel Ltd. Published works include Woon's Corporations Law; Company Law; and The ASEAN Charter - A Commentary' Professor Woon hopes to finish his book Essential Company Law while in Cambridge.

Professor Woon is sponsored by Dr Gardner.

 

Professor Tone Bringa, University of Bergen, Beaufort Visiting Fellow

Bringa T

Tone Bringa is Professor in Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen, Norway. Since she completed her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology on practiced Islam and ethnic belonging in Bosnia at the London School of Economics, she has explored the causes and effects of the war in Bosnia. More generally, she has been concerned with topics such as collapse of multi-ethnic states, post-socialist transformations, changing religious landscapes, and the politics of belonging highlighting how nationalist ideologies, fear and hate rhetoric directed at the “ethnic other” lead to genocide.

More recently, she has explored the spatial and temporal aspects of borders and the interaction between symbolic boundaries and territorial borders over time in order to gain a better understanding of the ethnic territorialisation of space, both through everyday spatial practices and through political means.

While a Beaufort Visiting Fellow at St. John’s she will be writing up fieldwork data, gathered in several villages and urban suburbs in Turkey settled by émigrés from Bosnia and Serbia who came to the country over the course of the 20th century. Based mainly on oral histories, this research resonates theoretically and thematically with several concerns that run through her academic work, not least a long term analytical and ethnographic approach which allows us to see how large scale historical events and developments shape and direct individuals’ life trajectories and their communities.

Her latest book is Eurasian Borderlands: Spatializing Borders in the Aftermath of State Collapse, co-edited with Hege Toje (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016).

Professor Bringa is sponsored by Professor Szreter.

 

Professor Rosi Braidotti, University of Utrecht

Rosi Braidotti

Rosi Braidotti has taught at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands since 1988, when she was appointed as the founding Professor in Women’s Studies. In 1995 she became the Founding Director of the Netherlands Research School of Women’s Studies, a position she held until 2005. Rosi Braidotti is currently Distinguished University Professor at Utrecht University.

Rosi Braidotti is a pioneer in European Women’s Studies: she founded the inter-university SOCRATES network NOISE and the Thematic Network for Women’s Studies ATHENA, which she directed until 2005.

Braidotti’s publications have consistently been placed in continental philosophy, at the intersection with social and political theory, cultural politics, gender, feminist theory and ethnicity studies. The core of her interdisciplinary work consists of four interconnected monographs on the constitution of contemporary subjectivity, with special emphasis on the concept of difference within the history of European philosophy and political theory. Influenced by philosophers such as Gilles Deleuze and especially “French feminist” thinker Luce Irigaray, Rosi Braidotti has brought postmodern feminism into the Information Age with her considerations of cyberspace, prosthesis, and the materiality of difference. She considers how ideas of gender difference can affect our sense of the human/animal and human/machine divides.

Rosi's latest book is Posthuman Knowledge, published by Polity Press, Cambridge in 2019.

As the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor at the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies, Professor Braidotti will undertake research on the theoretical foundations of the posthuman turn – in its post-humanistic and post-anthropocentric inceptions – and its effects on contemporary feminist theory practice. More specifically, she will aim to assess the implications of the posthuman predicament in epistemological and ethical terms, not only for feminist philosophy but also for contemporary reflection on the Humanities as a whole.

Professor Braidotti is sponsored by Professor Ulinka Rublack.